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The Tenuous Attachments of Working Class Men

Caption: Professor Kathryn Edin (Princeton) addresses the Life Course Centre Researchers' Week.
White working class males in the US are “at a moment of profound transition” as they renegotiate their relationships with the traditionally binding social institutions of work, family and religion.

This is the important message from on...

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People want solutions that work: Lessons from four decades of research

Caption: Professor Matt Sanders (UQ) addresses the Life Course Centre Researchers' Week.
There is arguably no one better qualified to talk on the challenge of turning great research ideas into practical, scalable policy solutions than Professor Matt Sanders, Life Course Centre Chief Investigator and Director of the Parenting & Famil...

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Collaboration and innovation at the heart of Researchers’ Week

Caption: Professors Kathryn Edin (Princeton) and Mark Western (UQ).
Life Course Centre researchers from throughout Australia recently gathered at The University of Queensland’s Long Pocket Campus this month for Researchers’ Week.

The program featured a range of presentations, workshops, networking and mentoring events to enhance ...

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Refugee Settlement and Wellbeing over the Life Course

There are now more people displaced by war and other disasters than at any time since the Second World War. Although most live in low-income countries, more than 1 million people have sought asylum in Germany, the United Kingdom and Australia in the last few years. This influx has had profound effects on domestic politics in those countries a...

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How stigma impacts LGB health and wellbeing in Australia

Francisco Perales, The University of Queensland

Research in Australia and internationally has documented poor health and wellbeing among LGBTQI people compared to heterosexual people. What’s less understood are the reasons why.

A dominant theory, the minority stress model, suggests that the discrimination and stigmatisation expe...

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Does parental joblessness delay young adults’ school-to-work transitions?

In Australia, parental joblessness is the single greatest cause of childhood poverty. LCC’s latest Working Paper by Matthew Curry, Irma Mooi-Reci, and Mark Wooden explores the impact of parental joblessness on young adults’ transition to the workforce.

Using a representative sample of young adults under the age of 25 that lived with th...

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Religious beliefs and risky behaviours in the teenage years

This article was originally published in May 2018.

A new LCC Working Paper by Silvia Mendolia, Alfredo R. Paloyo and Ian Walker explores the impact of religiosity on teenage propensity to engage in risky behaviours. The paper, titled ‘The Effect of Religiosity on Adolescent Risky Behaviors’, focuses specifically on risky health behavio...

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Growing up: When and why neighbourhoods matter

This article was originally published in May 2018.

A crucial question for policy is why do children growing up in some areas tend to do better than those growing up in others. A new LCC Working Paper by Nathan Deutscher answers this question by examining children who move neighbourhoods to see whether their outcomes mirror the children...

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Homelessness: Australia’s shameful story of policy complacency and failure continues

This article was originally published in May 2018.

Hal Pawson, UNSW and Cameron Parsell, The University of Queensland

Exactly a decade ago in 2008, the Australian government committed to an ambitious strategy to halve national homelessness by 2020. Through stepped-up early intervention, better homelessness services and an expand...

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New longitudinal study seeks solutions to Australia’s homelessness problem

This article was originally published in May 2018.

LCC researcher Associate Professor Cameron Parsell is set to embark on a new longitudinal study focusing on Australia’s homelessness problem. According to the 2016 Australian Census, rates of homelessness have increased by 14% since 2011.

The Australian Homelessness Monitor, whi...

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